Children of Blood and Bone

Children of Blood and Bone

Book - 2018
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Seventeen-year-old Zélie, her older brother Tzain, and rogue princess Amari fight to restore magic to the land and activate a new generation of magi, but they are ruthlessly pursued by the crown prince, who believes the return of magic will mean the end of the monarchy.
Publisher: New York :, Henry Holt and Company,, [2018]
ISBN: 9781250170972
Branch Call Number: TEEN ADE
Characteristics: 531 pages : maps ; 24 cm

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j
JCole333
Sep 16, 2018

This book was amazing! I couldn't put it down. The vibrant culture was skillfully woven through the story. I wish I could see this as a movie or series. There were so many powerful truths about humanity and how we view each other. Powerful

ArapahoeMaryA Aug 24, 2018

This debut YA fantasy boasts a badass heroine, epic battles, a touch of magic and a nod from the illustrious Jimmy Fallon...what's not to like?

l
Linyarai
Aug 22, 2018

Interesting plot and story line, but the characters weren't built up very much and the plot felt rushed. It felt like it occurred over 3 days, not a month. Zelie's sudden romance was silly and unnecessary, as was the death at the end. I'll still read the next book, I want to see where the rebellion leads and I like Roen.

ArapahoeRead Aug 22, 2018

An interesting fantasy novel that draws from African mythology to create an unique world. The story also comments on hate and prejudice, and the changes in POV are a nice touch. I'm looking forward to the rest of this series!

EvaELPL Aug 20, 2018

What an absolute delight. While this book is centered around several familiar young adult touchstones -- a fantasy dystopian society in upheaval, peril and intrigue, and a special girl who is the key to right it all -- it was still such a wonderful breath of fresh air in a sometimes oversaturated market. The elaborate world-building is rooted in West African culture and mythology, nearly the entire cast of characters is black (almost unheard of in the whitewashed world of mass market YA, particularly YA fantasy), and Adeyemi is a deft hand at weaving in timely issues related to social justice and equity: abuse of power on a structural level, colorism, systemic oppression and disenfranchisment, class and wealth inequality, and more. Every component of this novel is pieced together deliberately and thoughtfully with evocative and emotionally resonant writing, and the final product sets a new high bar for the genre.

ArapahoeJulieD Aug 01, 2018

If you like compelling characters, an engrossing story, and world-building that makes a fictional place feel tangible, then this is the book for you!

PimaLib_ChristineR Jul 28, 2018

This is an exceptional book. If you're a traditional YA reader, there's a chance the size of this novel and the names may give you the same kind of fear as attacking War & Peace. But in the same way that YA writers are expanding into Russia and using it as a basis for world-building, Adeyemi uses the heritage of Southwest Africa as a basis for her world.

Children of Blood and Bone is the kind of novel that spurred a bidding war by publishing companies and had a three-movie deal before it was even published, and that's for good reason. Adeyemi builds a compelling world where King Saran has somehow banished magic, including killing all of his subject able to practice magic, the Maji, in an attempt to secure his throne. It is now eleven years later, and Saran has discovered an object that will enable the hidden magic inside a diviner (a magi without magic), and he is determined to destroy it, and any hidden maji, for good. He has convinced his son, Inan, that the only way to hold power is to make sure that magic cannot be used against the throne.

Inan plays the villain, tracking down those who would bring back magic. On the other side is Zelie, a diviner (maji children come into their power as they mature and she was too young when magic disappeared) who watched her mother die at the hands of the king's men. Diviners are exposed by their white hair, and treated as, and literally called "maggots." She is strong, but still a child, with her view of the world clearly delineated by her village boundaries. It is only after she is sent on the run and tasked with returning magic to Orisha, that she begins to think about the world outside herself and her village. She is aided in her quest by her brother, Tzain, and by Inan's sister, the Princess Amari. Amari has left the palace after her father uses her best friend as an experiment in magic.

The world-building here is extraordinary, without being expository. Nothing slows the trajectory of the plot as it builds to a fever pitch. Adeyemi uses flashbacks to good effect to explain anything that can't easily be shown to the reader. Heartbreaking at times, the story, through Zelie's growth from someone who wants to be a big fish in a small pond and doesn't consider the consequence of her action, to someone who realizes how small she really is, yet how important her decisions can be, is beautiful and exciting to read. I almost wish I hadn't read it until the next one in the trilogy was out, so I wouldn't have to wait!

t
TEENREVIEWBOARD
Jul 24, 2018

I think 99% of the world loved this book, and trust me. I wanted to love it, too. The diverse cast of characters, a land of magic, themes of revenge, and fantasy all gripped me. I thought I was going to love Zélie and her badass nature, and that there was going to be all the elements of a wonderful fantasy book. I thought I would find a new favourite. That’s not to say this book was horrible . There were definitely some positives, and I will be picking up the sequel. It’s just that my expectations were so high and… in the end, I was just so disappointed. The story follows Zélie, a divîner in Ilorin who is training in secret with Mama Agba. Alongside her fellow divîners, she learns to fight and train while the threat of guards is forever lurking. Although all divîners are supposed to grow into powerful maji, King Saran led an attack on all maji that destroyed magic, killing thousands, including Zélie’s mother. When fate entwines her with Princess Amari, she sets off on a journey to restore magic once and for all. Zélie was one of the most immature, stupid characters I’ve ever read about. You know those characters that you scream at in your head? That make you want to physically throw the book against the wall? She was the main reason why I disliked this book so much. She consistently made horrible decisions, and it was always others that had to pay for her utter lack of logic. The romance was… so disappointing. Tzain was the light at the end of the tunnel, and I’m praying for his POV in the next installment.

j
jaywxyz_
Jul 13, 2018

Hard to put down, had to force myself to get a decent amount of sleep. The reason that I gave it 4/5 was only because of the romance between Inan and Zelie, felt the book didn't need it. But all in all, great book.

TSCPL_Miranda Jul 08, 2018

In Orisha, those with magic have been stomped down out of fear and hate. Now, a group of young people fights to bring back magic and take down a cruel monarchy, while discovering their own strength and powers.
It won't be easy.
So, so good--absolutely un-put-down-able. Fantasy with a powerful social message, strong characters, skillful world building, and multiple perspectives represented. A well-plotted adventure with roots in deep mythology. And I have to wait until 2019 for the next book!
If you aren't convinced yet...they ride giant cats!

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OPL_KrisC Jul 06, 2018

OPL_KrisC thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

sarahbru17 May 11, 2018

sarahbru17 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

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ArapahoeMaryA Aug 24, 2018

As it fades, I see the truth - in plain sight, yet hidden all along. We are all children of blood and bone. All instruments of vengeance and virtue. This truth holds me close, rocking me like a child in a mother's arms. It binds me in its love as death swallows me in its grasp.

s
shayshortt
Jun 13, 2018

Deep down, I know the truth. I knew it the moment I saw the maji of Ibadan in chains. The gods died with our magic. They are never coming back.

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s
shayshortt
Jun 13, 2018

Once, Orïsha was the land of maji, ten powerful clans, each with their own unique powers to command earth or water, life or death. But eleven years ago, King Saran conducted the Raid, cutting the maji off from their gods, and killing every practitioner old enough to have come into their powers. Only the divîners remain. Children at the time of the Raid, they will live their entire lives under the heel of the Royal Guard, derided as maggots, never coming into their inheritance. It seems that the gods have abandoned Orïsha. But tension is brewing in the royal family. Princess Amari’s best friend is a divîner named Binta, who serves as her chamber maid, and Prince Inan is hiding a dark secret of his own. Having lost her mother in the Raid, a young divîner named Zélie harbours a deep resentment for the royal family, and a longing for the Reaper powers she should have inherited on her thirteenth birthday. Instead, she trains to fight with a staff, and dreams of a day when the divîners will rise up against their oppressors. But the gods have plans to throw some unusual allies in her path.

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