The Confessions of Frannie Langton

The Confessions of Frannie Langton

A Novel

eBook - 2019
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"Deep-diving, elegant + tough." —Margaret Atwood via @MargaretAtwood "By turns lush, gritty, wry, gothic and compulsive, The Confessions of Frannie Langton is a dazzling page-turner. With as much psychological savvy as righteous wrath, Sara Collins twists together the slave narrative, bildungsroman, love story and crime novel to make something new." —Emma Donoghue "A startling, compelling historical debut novel. . . . Should be on top of your vacation reading pile." —The Washington Post "Reminiscent of Margaret Atwood's Alias Grace. . . . [A] devious, richly detailed debut." —O: The Oprah Magazine A servant and former slave is accused of murdering her employer and his wife in this astonishing historical thriller that moves from a Jamaican sugar plantation to the fetid streets of Georgian London—a remarkable literary debut with echoes of Alias Grace , The Underground Railroad and The Paying Guest All of London is abuzz with the scandalous case of Frannie Langton, accused of the brutal double murder of her employers, renowned scientist George Benham and his eccentric French wife, Marguerite. Crowds pack the courtroom, eagerly following every twist, while the newspapers print lurid theories about the killings and the mysterious woman being tried at the Old Bailey. The testimonies against Frannie are damning. She is a seductress, a witch, a master manipulator, a whore. But Frannie claims she cannot recall what happened that fateful evening, even if remembering could save her life. She doesn't know how she came to be covered in the victims' blood. But she does have a tale to tell: a story of her childhood on a Jamaican plantation, her apprenticeship under a debauched scientist who stretched all bounds of ethics, and the events that brought her into the Benhams' London home—and into a passionate and forbidden relationship. Though Frannie's testimony may seal her conviction, the truth will unmask the perpetrators of crimes far beyond murder and indict the whole of English society itself. The Confessions of Frannie Langton is a breathtaking debut: a murder mystery that travels across the Atlantic and through the darkest channels of history. A brilliant, searing depiction of race, class and oppression that penetrates the skin and sears the soul, it is the story of a woman of her own making in a world that would see her unmade.
Publisher: 2019
ISBN: 9781443456197
Branch Call Number: e-book
Characteristics: 1 online resource
Alternative Title: Library2Go

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finn75
Sep 20, 2020

Frannie Langton's story is a slave narrative, love story, and crime story all in one book. It leaves you guessing until the end though man's inhumanity to man is obvious throughout this dark tale.

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maipenrai
May 21, 2020

As a reader of Holocaust history and recently a biography of Mengele it is not surprising that I found myself at times seeing presentiments of racial experiments to come. There are no words to capture the depravity of the slave trade and slave owners. The most quoted estimate is that 12.5 million Africans were stolen for the slave trade to the western hemisphere in the 17th - 19th centuries; some 10.6 million survived the infamous Middle Passage across the Atlantic. This is a genocide of 2,000,000 deaths during transportation. The larger holocaust which cannot be tabulated is that of the souls of people in bondage. Frannie Langton's story speaks to the attempt of inhuman owners to not only own the body, but to experiment with and attempt to destroy the spirit. They did not succeed with Frannie. Kristi & Abby

IndyPL_KimE Jan 27, 2020

This book left me speechless. Even though it is set in the early 19th century, the themes in this book are still relevant in the 21st century. The book slowly creeps into the story and it takes readers on a roller coaster ride of emotions. Hold on to your heart as you read this book.

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uncommonreader
Dec 15, 2019

A gothic novel set in Georgian England told by a Jamaican slave who is made to work for a "scientist" trying to prove that black people are not human. She is brought to London and "given" to another "scientist" in whose household the drama unfolds. Frannie is clever and articulate and best of all, does not see herself as a victim.

s
selfishgiant
Dec 13, 2019

Globe 100 2019. British. Renders the past so vividly that it feels as urgent as the present. Early 19th century

debwalker Nov 30, 2019

On the Globe and Mail's list of the top 100 books of 2019.

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MaryElizabeth17
Aug 03, 2019

Sara Collins has given Frannie Langton such a strong and true voice. It carries the book and pulls you into her story.

ArapahoeAnnaL Jun 10, 2019

A powerful and deservedly dark tale about the experience of individual and societal brutality, slavery, obsessive and forbidden love, drug addiction, and murder. Uplifting for the human spirit of decency and dignity the main character possesses amid the horrors of her life.
Fascinating for the light it sheds on early 19th century plantation society in Jamaica and upper and lower class lives in England.

l
lizharr
May 26, 2019

WSJ 5/25/19

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ArapahoeAnnaL Jun 10, 2019

The white man is the measure of all things, and of all things the measure is the white man. That was how I felt when we latched arms. Oh. No matter what any moment holds, memory makes of it either nothing at all or unending terror, or ceaseless grief. All I have left of that night are flashes of her diamond ear-bobs, the swells of her moving against me like tides, the feel of her, like a taste I couldn't get out of my mouth. pg. 127

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